History

Ananguku Arts was established by Inawinytji Williamson and long-serving art centre manager Beverley Peacock, with the support of Country Arts SA, ATSIC and Desart to provide coordination and services at a regional level to artists on the APY Lands[1].

Based on the successes of the APY Lands, Inawinytji Williamson, the founding Chairperson, Director Milyika Carroll, with founding General Manager Colin Koch, visited communities throughout South Australia to offer similar supports to Aboriginal artists in remote/regional areas.

History

Key developments in the APY region and establishment of art centres

1900
1940's First contact period.
1948
Ernabella Arts founded.
1962
Many Anangu move back to the west to their traditional homelands.
1976
Pitjantjatjara Council formed to campaign for Land Rights in the tri-state region.
1978
Pitjantjatjara Homelands Health Service started.
1980
Ngaanyatjarra Pitjantjatjara Yankunyatjara Women's Council, established by women at a meeting at Kanpi in 1980.
1981
Anangu Pitjantjatjara (the statutory landholding body) is set up.
1982
Pitjantjatjara Land Rights Act gives inalienable freehold title for North West Reserve of South Australia to Anangu.
1983
Nganampa Health Council formed.
mid 1970's
Kaltjiti Arts and Crafts started at Fregon, art and craft centre set up at Amata.
early 1980's
Indulkana Arts Association (now Iwantja Arts and Crafts) started at Indulkana.
1999
Minymaku Arts (now Tjala Arts) started at Amata.
1999
Irrunytju Arts started by Amanda Dent and women at Irrunytju (Wingellina).
1997
Ananguku Arts and Culture Aboriginal Corporation founded (inc. 2002).
2003
Rope Story Sculptural and Storytelling project at WOMAdelaide.
2004
Amanda Dent engaged by Ananguku Arts as a roving coordinator to work with artists in five western communities. Over 120 people participated ranging in age from 15 to 95. 30% of artists were male.
2004
Tjala Arts established at Amata incorporating Minymaku Arts.
2004
Mimili Maku set up at Mimili, auspiced by Ananguku Arts.
2005
Tjungu Palya established at Nyapari.
2005
Ninuku Arts established at Kalka, auspiced by Ananguku Arts.
2007
The Statewide (SICAD) project starts to take the learnings from APY Lands models to regional SA. APY Lands regional exhibition at Spoleto and Milan, Italy. Jimmy Baker and Maringka Baker represented in Culture Warriors survey of Indigenous Art curated by Brenda Croft.
2008
Ananguku Arts' Artswroker training and employment program starts with the employment of three Indigenous Arts Workers in regional SA plus employment of five Anangu trainee art centre assistant managers.
2008/09
New Tjala Arts Centre built at Amata.
2009
Training and employment program grows to employ 29 Indigenous Artsworkers on APY Lands.
2010
Ananguku Arts, along with the South Australian Museum, mount a ‘best of the best' exhibition – ‘Tjukurpa Pulkatjara: The Power of the Law' - at the South Australian Museum.
2011
Ananguku Arts members vote to become a statewide organisation, electing Joy Haynes, a Kokatha artist from Ceduna, and Ngarrindjeri cultural leader Major Sumner to the Board.
2012
APY Art Centres infrastructure project commences. Ananguku Arts receives $4 million funding from Arts SA, Office for The Arts (OFTA), and the Department of Regional Australia.

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As a member of the Indigenous Art Code we are committed to the principles of ethical trade in Indigenous art.